Making Stored Procedure Changes With Limited Downtime

I continue my series on database development in a (near) zero downtime environment:

Versioning a procedure is pretty simple: you create a new procedure with alterations you want. Corporate naming standards where I’m at have you add a number to the end of versioned procedures, so if you have dbo.SomeProcedure, the new version would be dbo.SomeProcedure01. Then, the next time you version, you’ll have dbo.SomeProcedure02 and so on. For frequently-changing procedures, you might get up to version 05 or 06, but in practice, you’re probably not making that many changes to a procedure’s signature. For example, looking at a directory with exactly 100 procedures in it, I see 7 with a number at the end. Two of those seven procedures are old versions of procedures I can’t drop quite yet, so that means that there are only five “unique” procedures that we’ve versioned in a code base which is two years old. Looking at a different part of the code with 879 stored procedures, 95 have been versioned at least once in the 15 or so years of that code base’s existence. The real number is a bit higher than that because we’ve renamed procedures over time and renamings tend to start the process over as we might go from dbo.SomeProcedure04 to dbo.SomeNewProcedure when we redesign underlying tables or make other drastic architectural changes.

The secret is, I’m always versioning.

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