Dynamic Data Masking and Execution Plans

Kevin Feasel

2019-02-11

T-SQL

Arthur Daniels looks at what you can see in an execution plan with dynamic data masking:

I think Dynamic Data Masking is pretty cool. The idea is basically to provide a mask for certain users when they might see protected data. The documentation on this feature is actually pretty deep, it’s worth a look.

I just want to show you how you can see the masking in an execution plan. Let’s mask some data in StackOverflow2010! (Also, there’s an interesting side note at the end)

Click through for those notes.

Concerns With DISTINCT

Kevin Feasel

2019-02-11

Syntax

Anvesh Patel does not like DISTINCT:

I am telling you personally that I hate the use of DISTINCT.
DISTINCT used by those people, who are not sure about their data set or SELECT statement or JOINS.
Whenever I get any query with DISTINCT, immediately I suggest to remove it.

I agree with this sentiment about 85% of the time. There are cases where I know l am working with data at a finer grain than I need and the counts aren’t important. But just tossing a DISTINCT on a query to stop it from repeating rows is the wrong approach: figure out why that repetition happens and fix it.

One More Data Gateway Is All You Need

Meagan Longoria explains when you might need data gateways when implementing an Azure BI architecture:

Let’s start with what services may require you to use a data gateway.

You will need a data gateway when you are using Power BI, Azure Analysis Services, PowerApps, Microsoft Flow, Azure Logic Apps, Azure Data Factory, or Azure ML with a data source/destination that is in a private network that isn’t connected to your Azure subscription with a VPN gateway. Note that a private network includes on-premises data sources and Azure Virtual Machines as well as Azure SQL Databases and Azure SQL Data Warehouses that require use of VNet service endpoints rather than public endpoints.  

There are a few of them so check out Meagan’s post and take notes.

Azure VM Boot Diagnostics

John Morehouse shows us how to enable and use boot diagnostics on Azure VMs to troubleshoot why that server isn’t coming up the way you’d expect:

The next blade will show you an active console of the virtual machine.  From here you are able to determine what the current status of the virtual machine might be.  You will also noticed that you can gain access to the serial log (shown below), which will give you more detailed information about the boot process.
Once we click on Boot Diagnostics, we will then see the initial startup screens of the server:

This is useful if you have some huge misconfiguration and the server’s failing for some reason.

Shredding Extended Event XML

Dave Mason shows us how you can use T-SQL to shred XML coming from extended events sessions:

Querying the data of an Extended Events session has never been easy. My XEvent sessions typically store event data in a target file, which means using sys.fn_xe_file_target_read_file. To get something of value, you need to shred the event data XML.

Doing this in T-SQL isn’t great. It’s probably better to shred in another language—F# would probably be my choice due to its type provider—and dump the results back into SQL. But if you want to stick to one language, Dave shows you how.

Sqoop From MySQL To Cloudera

Kevin Feasel

2019-02-07

Hadoop

Alan Choi and Laurel Hale show us how to use Sqoop to migrate data from MySQL into Impala:

The basic import steps described for tiny tables applies to importing bigger tables into Impala. The difference occurs when you construct your sqoop import command. For large tables, you want it to run fast, so setting parallelism to 1, which specifies one map task during the import won’t work well. Instead, using the default parallelism setting, which is 4 map tasks to import in parallel, is a good place to start. So you don’t need to specify a value for the -m option unless you want to increase the number of parallel map tasks.
Another difference is that bigger tables usually have a primary key, which become good candidates where you can split the data without skewing it. The tiny_table we imported earlier doesn’t have a primary key. Also note that the -e option for the sqoop import command, which instructs Sqoop to import the data returned for the specified SQL statement doesn’t work if you split data on a string column. If stringcolumns are used to split the data with the -e option, it generates incompatible SQL. So if you decide to split data on the primary key for your bigger table, make sure the primary key is on a column of a numeric data type, such as int, which works best with the -e option because it generates compatible SQL.

Read the whole thing. Sqoop has been around for a while because it does its job well.

Wait Stats And Missing Indexes

Arthur Daniels explains that missing indexes can cause high wait stat counts to appear:

At first, this statement might sound a bit confusing. Usually, we expect wait statistics to show us what a query is waiting on, whether it’s waiting on memory, loading pages from disk, or any of the other numerous wait types.
Once you start collecting wait statistics, you’ll have a lot of data to sort through. You might find waits like CX_PACKET, CX_CONSUMER, and PAGEIOLATCH. Surprisingly, these could mean that your databases aren’t well indexed.

This makes sense. At its core, wait stats tell you where SQL Server is hurting: where is the bottleneck. But just like a person at the doctor, SQL Server can only be so specific in how it relates this pain to you, and that specificity generally boils down to hardware components. The solution might be “get more hardware,” but as Arthur points out, writing better queries and using better indexes can mitigate those pains too.

Pipelines Everywhere

Kevin Feasel

2019-02-07

R

John Mount explains the benefit of pipes and pipelines, and shows us an advanced pipe in R:

The idea is: many important calculations can be considered as a sequence of transforms applied to a data set. Each step may be a function taking many arguments. It is often the case that only one of each function’s arguments is primary, and the rest are parameters. For data science applications this is particularly common, so having convenient pipeline notation can be a plus. An example of a non-trivial data processing pipeline can be found here.

In this note we will discuss the advanced R pipeline operator “dot arrow pipe” and an S4 class (wrapr::UnaryFn) that makes working with pipeline notation much more powerful and much easier.

As you’d expect from John, there’s a lot of detail and it’s an interesting approach.

BPE: The Answer To A Question Nobody Asked

Randolph West is not a big fan of Buffer Pool Extension in practice:

Unfortunately there are some practical problems with the Buffer Pool Extension in 2019.
Firstly, let’s talk about the licensing contradiction with SQL Server Standard Edition. Since 2016 Service Pack 1, we have been able to access 128 GB of memory for the buffer pool, plus additional RAM for in-memory OLTP and Columnstore indexes. The practical limits of Standard Edition have been — for the most part — all but lifted. By the same token, if we can afford Enterprise Edition, we can afford more physical RAM. In other words, if we need more than 128 GB RAM for the buffer pool, perhaps we should move away from Standard Edition.

Title aside, Randolph makes a really good point: Buffer Pool Extension was one of those features which sounded great during development, but hardware quickly overtook it and made it all but irrelevant. On the whole, that’s a positive for us as SQL Server users.

Power BI Workspace V2

Reza Rad shows us the differences between Power BI Workspace V1 and V2:

Workspace version 2 has been available in Power BI Service for more than 6 months now. The new version introduced in August 2018, however, still many people don’t know what it is, and what is the difference of that with the old version, and the most important question: Should you create the new workspace in V2 or V1? Should you click on the Try Now button when you create the new workspace or not? I have previously written about workspaces and their important role in creating a collaborative environment. In this post, I’ll answer all questions above to help you make the right decision when creating the workspace. If you like to learn more about Power BI, read Power BI book from Rookie to Rock Star.

I’ll admit I was unaware of V2 workspaces. This was interesting reading.

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