Conjoint Analysis In R

Abhijit Telang introduces the concept of conjoint analysis and shows how you can implement this in R:

We will need to typically transform the problem of utility modeling from its intangible, abstract form to something that is measurable. That is, we wish to assign a numeric value to the perceived utility by the consumer, and we want to measure that accurately and precisely (as much as possible).

This is where survey design comes in, where, as a market researcher, we must design inputs (in the form of questionnaires) to have respondents do the hard work of transforming their qualitative, habitual, perceptual opinions into  simplified, summarized aggregate values which are expressed either as a numeric value or on a rank scale.

I tend to shy away from this kind of analysis because it runs a huge risk of trying to turn ordinal utility rankings into cardinal functions.

Tips For Using PolyBase With Cloudera QuickStart VM

I have a post on using Cloudera’s QuickStart VM with PolyBase:

Here’s something which tripped me up a little bit while connecting to Cloudera using SQL Server. The data node name, instead of being quickstart.cloudera like the host name, is actually localhost. You can change this in /etc/cloudera-scm-agent/config.ini.

Because PolyBase needs to have direct access to the data nodes, having a node called localhost is a bit of a drag.

I’m used to the Hortonworks Data Platform, so this is a quick compendium of things I noticed to were different.

Creating Power Query Custom Connectors

Eugene Meidinger shows how easy it can be to create a customer Power Query connector:

When I heard about custom data connectors for Power Query, I had assumed there would be a lot of work involved. While there is definitely quite a bit of work in implementing advanced features like query folding,  creating your very first connector is simple.

So, first you need Visual studio installed and the Power Query SDK installed as well. Once you do that, you will see Power Query as an option when creating a new project. Visual studio will also have support for .pq or Power Query files.

Click through for an example of the process in action.

Disable Lightweight Pooling

Randolph West explains why enabling lightweight pooling in SQL Server is almost always a bad idea:

When can I enable lightweight pooling then?
Don’t. But if you must, these are the conditions under which Microsoft suggests it may be useful:
– Large multi-processor servers are in use.
– All servers are running at or near maximum capacity.
– A lot of context switching occurs (greater than 20,000 per second).

We can measure context switching with a performance counter in Performance Monitor on Windows, so the last two items on this list can be monitored. Use the Context Switches/sec counter to track context switches.

I’m sure there were a few customers who benefited from this, but I’ve neither seen nor heard of a case where it did actually help.

Creating Custom Helm Charts For SQL Server

Andrew Pruski shows us how we can build our own Helm chart to deploy SQL Server to Kubernetes:

Navigate to the new directory: –

cd C:\Helm

And now create the new chart!

helm create testsqlchart

OK, what that has done is create an empty chart so we need to drop in our yaml configuration files.

Read on to see how to generate the chart and use it to deploy SQL Server.

Displaying Filters In Power BI Tooltips

Marco Russo shows how you can create a filter dump measure to show all active filters as part of your tooltip:

The Tooltips can display a string with multiple lines. This is useful for the DumpFilters measure that creates a new line for every column with a filter. You might wonder why the DumpFilters measure is required considering that Power BI can already display any filters and slicers affecting a visual. The reason is that the DumpFilters measure isolates the filters of a single cell and can show the effects of filters that are not visible in the standard visualization provided by Power BI.

This is interesting reading and a good way of sharing to users how they got to the current view of data.

T-SQL Tuesday 111 Roundup

Andy Leonard wants to know your “why”:

The T-SQL Tuesday question this month: Why do you do what you do? I was honored to be asked by Steve Jones to serve as host. Thanks, Steve!
Although I should not be, I am surprised by the response. We are part of an awesome and enduring Community. There were 35 responses to this month’s T-SQL Tuesday! 

That’s a lot of reading to do.

Formatting Powershell Outputs

Jeffery Hicks shows us how we can format Powershell files through XML:

My PSScriptTools module (which you can install from the PowerShell Gallery) now includes a command called New-PSFormatXML. The command is designed to analyze an object and by default create a table view of all properties, although you can specify which properties to include. The format.ps1xml file will autosize the table but you can remove the directive and use the widths which are best guesses. Expect some trial and error when defining a new view.

Read on for a couple demonstrations.

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