Disable Lightweight Pooling

Randolph West explains why enabling lightweight pooling in SQL Server is almost always a bad idea:

When can I enable lightweight pooling then?
Don’t. But if you must, these are the conditions under which Microsoft suggests it may be useful:
– Large multi-processor servers are in use.
– All servers are running at or near maximum capacity.
– A lot of context switching occurs (greater than 20,000 per second).

We can measure context switching with a performance counter in Performance Monitor on Windows, so the last two items on this list can be monitored. Use the Context Switches/sec counter to track context switches.

I’m sure there were a few customers who benefited from this, but I’ve neither seen nor heard of a case where it did actually help.

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