Case Classes In Scala

Shubham Dangare explains what case classes are in Scala:

Case class is scale way to allow pattern matching on an object without requiring a large amount of boilerplate. All you need to do is add a single case keyword modifier to each class that you want to pattern matching using such modifier makes scala compiler add some syntactic conveniences to your class and compiler add companion object(with the apply method)
Adds factory method with the name of the class this means that for instance, you can write StringValue(“X”) to construct a StringValue object instead of using new StringValue(“X”)

Given how useful case classes are in Spark, it’s good to know how they operate. For more background on the topic, Alessandro Lacava has a post from a few years back describing the topic well.

Related Posts

Selecting a List of Columns from Spark

Unmesha SreeVeni shows us how we can create a list of column names in Scala to pass into a Spark DataFrame’s select function: Now our example dataframe is ready.Create a List[String] with column names.scala> var selectExpr : List[String] = List("Type","Item","Price") selectExpr: List[String] = List(Type, Item, Price) Now our list of column names is also created.Lets […]

Read More

No Type Equivalence In M

Imke Feldmann notes an oddity in types in Power Query: But this function will not return any matches. I also tried out a (potentially) slower version using Table.SelectColumns(Types, each [Value] = x[Types]) – but still no match.  What I found particularly frustrating here was, that in some cases, these lookups or filters on type-columns worked. […]

Read More

Categories

February 2019
MTWTFSS
« Jan Mar »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728