Get Windows Failover Cluster Errors

John Morehouse walks us through the Get-ClusterLog cmdlet in Powershell:

Sometimes you know that a problem occurred, but the tools are not giving you the right information.  If you ever look at the Cluster Failover Manager for a Windows Cluster, sometimes that can happen.  The user interface won’t show you any errors, but you KNOW there was an issue.  This is when knowing how to use other tools to extract information from the cluster log becomes useful.
You can choose to use either Powershell or a command at the command prompt.  I tend to lean towards Powershell. I find it easier to utilize and gives me the most flexibility.

Click through for an example, including of a method which filters out everything but error messages.

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