Working With Missing Values In R

Anisa Dhana has a few examples of ways we can work with data containing missing values in R:

Imputation is a complex process that requires a good knowledge of your data. For example, it is crucial to know whether the missing is at random or not before you impute the data. I have read a nice tutorial which visualize the missing data and help to understand the type of missing, and another post showing how to impute the data with MICE package.

In this short post, I will focus on management of the missing data using the tidyverse package. Specifically, I will show how to manage missings in the long data format (i.e., more than one observation for id).

Anisa shows a few different techniques, depending upon what you need to do with the data.  I’d caution about using mean in the second example and instead typically prefer median, as replacing missing values with the median won’t alter the distribution in the way that it can with mean.

Configuring Kafka Streams For Least Privilege

Gwen Shapira explains how we can assign minimal rights to Kafka Streams and KSQL users:

The principle of least privilege dictates that each user and application will have the minimal privileges required to do their job. When applied to Apache Kafka® and its Streams API, it usually means that each team and application will have read and write access only to a selected few relevant topics.

Organizations need to balance developer velocity and security, which means that each organization will likely have their own requirements and best practices for access control.

There are two simple patterns you can use to easily configure the right privileges for any Kafka Streams application—one provides tighter security, and the other is for more agile organizations. First, we’ll start with a bit of background on why configuring proper privileges for Kafka Streams applications was challenging in the past.

Read the whole thing; “granting everybody all rights” generally isn’t a good idea, no matter what your data platform of choice may be.

Working With Key-Value Pairs In Spark

Teena Vashist shows us a few of the functions available with Spark for working with key-value pairs:

1. Creating Key/Value Pair RDD: 
The pair RDD arranges the data of a row into two parts. The first part is the Key and the second part is the Value. In the below example, I used a parallelize method to create a RDD, and then I used the length method to create a Pair RDD. The key is the length of the each word and the value is the word itself.

scala> val rdd = sc.parallelize(List("hello","world","good","morning"))
rdd: org.apache.spark.rdd.RDD[String] = ParallelCollectionRDD[0] at parallelize at <console>:24
scala> val pairRdd = rdd.map(a => (a.length,a))
pairRdd: org.apache.spark.rdd.RDD[(Int, String)] = MapPartitionsRDD[1] at map at <console>:26
scala> pairRdd.collect().foreach(println)
(5,hello)
(5,world)
(4,good)
(7,morning)

Click through for more operations.  Spark is a bit less KV-centric than classic MapReduce jobs, but there are still plenty of places where you want to use them.

Getting Maintenance Plan Information From Powershell

Shane O’Neill gives us the low-down on what we need to do in order to retrieve maintenance plan information from SQL Server using Powershell:

It’s surprisingly difficult to get this information in SQL Server. In fact I was quite stuck trying to figure out how to get this information when I realized that the good people over at Brent Ozar Unlimited already do some checking on this for their sp_Blitz tool.

A quick look at the above code showed me that dbo.sysssispackages was what I was looking for. Combine this with:

  • 1. Some hack-y SQL for the frequency in human readable format, and
  • 2. Some even more hack-y SQL to join on the SQL Agent Job name

And we had pretty much the XML for the Maintenance Plan and the SQL Agent Job Schedule that they were against.

Shane has made the code available as well, so check it out if you have any maintenance plans you’re trying to understand and maybe even get away from.

Gaining Business Understanding Through Paying Attention

Laura Ellis lays down some good tips for understanding business problems:

I know this sounds somewhat silly. But, when thinking through the steps that I take to solve a business problem, I realized that I do employ a strategy. The backbone of that strategy is based on the principals of solving a word problem. Yes, that’s right. Does anyone else remember staring at those first complex word problems as a kid and not quite knowing where to start? I do! However, when my teacher provided us with strategies to break down the problem into less intimidating, actionable steps, everything became rather doable. The steps: circle the question, highlight the important information and cross out unnecessary information. Do these steps and all of a sudden the problem is simplified and much less scary. What a relief! By employing the same basic strategy, we too can feel that sense of calm when working on a business problem.

It sounds blase but paying attention to what people are saying (or writing) versus hearing a few words and assuming the rest.

SQL Managed Instance Business Critical Tier Now Available

Jovan Popovic announces Azure SQL Managed Instance Business Critical tier has reached GA:

We are happy to announce General availability of Business Critical tier in Azure SQL Managed Instance – architectural model built for high-performance and IO demanding databases.

After 5 months of public preview period Azure SQL Managed Instance Business Critical Service tier is generally available.

Azure SQL Managed Instance Business Critical tier is built for high performance databases and applications that require low IO latency of 1-2ms in average with up to 100K IOPS that can be achieved using fast local SSD that this tier uses to place database files.

Click through to see what Business Critical tier in particular has to offer.

The Power Of Dual Storage Mode For Power BI Aggregations

Reza Rad continues a series on Power BI aggregations by explaining how using the Dual storage mode can make queries faster if you use both Import and DirectQuery sources:

This is not what we actually expect to see. The whole purpose of Sales Agg table is to speed up the process from DirectQuery mode, but we are still querying the DimDate from the database. So, what is the solution? Do we change the storage mode of DimDate to Import? If we do that, then what about the connection between DimDate and FactInternetSales? We want that connection to work as DirectQuery of course.

Now that you learned about the challenge, is a good time to talk about the third storage mode; Dual.

Read on for an example-filled tutorial.

Categories

December 2018
MTWTFSS
« Nov  
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31