Checking If Ports Are Open Using Powershell

Anthony Nocentino has a quick Powershell script to see if ports are open on a machine:

Ever want to confirm that a port is accessible from one computer to another? There’s a PowerShell cmdlet for that, Test-NetConnection. With the -Port option, this cmdlet will do a quick TCP three-way handshake on the remote system to confirm that the service is available and reports back if it succeeded or not. Check out that last line of output TcpTestSucceeded: False. That indicates that this port is not accessible. You can see, however, that the system is reachable via ICMP (Ping), PingSuceeded: True so we know that the remote system is alive, just not listening on the port we want to access.

For when your security team won’t let you install nmap.

Related Posts

Powershell Core Preview 3 Fails To Start

Max Trinidad walks us through an issue with Powershell Core Preview 3: Just in case you haven’t try to install PowerShell Core Preview.3, in Windows, which became available on the evening of the 10th of December. If are doing a clean installation, meaning that it was previously manually uninstall, or that this is your first […]

Read More

Traversing Nearest Neighbors With Dijkstra’s Algorithm And SQL Server Graph

James Livingston gives us a Powershell-based implementation of Dijkstra’s shortest path algorithm: In my previous post I shared a SQL Server 2017 graph database of US capitals. Graphs are a computer science core competency and present some interesting challenges for programmers. Most notable of these challenges is finding the shortest path between nodes. Dijkstra’s algorithm is a commonly […]

Read More

Categories

November 2018
MTWTFSS
« Oct Dec »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930