Things Not To Do In SQL Server

Randolph West has a how-not-to guide for SQL Server:

Don’t use TIMESTAMP

We covered this in detail in a previous post, What about TIMESTAMP? It’s better to pretend that this data type doesn’t exist.

Why not?

It is not what you think it is. TIMESTAMP is actually a row version value based on the amount of time since SQL Server was started. If you need to record an actual date and time, use DATETIME2 instead.

When should we?

Never.

I appreciate that Randolph includes a “when should you not listen to my overall pronouncement?” bit, as there are commonly exceptions to “do not do X” style rules.

Related Posts

Permission Set In A Post-SQL 2017 CLR World

Solomon Rutzky investigates what the PERMISSION_SET property does as of SQL Server 2017: And farther down on that same page, there is a note stating:  Important The PERMISSION_SET option is affected by the clr strict security option, described in the opening warning. When clr strict security is enabled, all assemblies are treated as UNSAFE. The last sentence in each of those quoted statements […]

Read More

Tracking Deployment Details

Andy Leonard tells a story whose moral is that you need to keep track of what you deploy: But this had to be done. Right now. I thanked Geoff and hung up the phone. I then made another judgment call and exercised yet more of my ETL Architect authority. I assigned the PrUAT ticket to myself, logged […]

Read More

Categories

August 2018
MTWTFSS
« Jul Sep »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031