Relationships In Power BI

Teo Lachev shows us the importance of defining relationships in Power BI:

However, If there isn’t a direct relationship between ResellerSales and Employee, the moment you add an unsummarized field from the second table on the many side, such as Employee[FullName] after adding SalesTerritoryCountry and ResellerSales[SalesOrderNumber), you’ll get the error “Error: Can’t determine relationships between the fields”.

Solution: Interestingly, the report works fine if a summarized field, such as COUNT(Employee[EmployeeKey]) is used. In this case, the SalesTerritory dimension acts as a conformed dimension joined to two fact tables. The reason why it doesn’t work when Employee[FullName] is added is because there is no aggregation on the Employee table and the relationship between ResellerSales[SalesOrderNumber] and Employee[FullName] becomes Many:Many over SalesTerritory which is now a bridge table. One employee may be associated with multiple sales and a sale can be associated with multiple employees. How do we solve this horrible problem?

Good data modeling is important, and Power BI dashboards are no exception to the rule.

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