Mutli-Branch Pipelines In Jenkins

Chris Adkin continues his SQL Server continuous integration series:

Whatever you elect to do there will always be a master branch, where you go from here depends on whether you favor branching or feature toggles. Wikipedia provides a nice definition of what a feature toggle is, thus:

feature toggle[1] (also feature switchfeature flagfeature flipperconditional feature, etc.) is a technique in software development that attempts to provide an alternative to maintaining multiple source-code branches (known as feature branches), such that a feature can be tested even before it is completed and ready for release. Feature toggle is used to hide, enable or disable the feature during run time. For example, during the development process, a developer can enable the feature for testing and disable it for other users.[2]

A branch is initially a clone of the master branch to begin with, developers work on the branch. Once the work on that branch is code complete and it has been tested to satisfaction, it is merged into the master. An overview of the branching and merging process is provided in the Git documentation here.

The continuous integration and delivery purist are not great fans of branches and prefer the ethos of integrating changes into one place to be rigidly adhered to, ergo one code branch only. However, in practice you will find that most projects have to come up with some sane branching strategy. The subject of branching is a topic in its own right, suffice it to say there is an overhead in applying changes across multiple branches and overheads involved in merging into the master branch. Therefore, there needs to be some governance and rigor applied around the number of branches in the source code repository.

Chris then shows us how to create a multi-branch pipeline with Jenkins.

Related Posts

Near-Zero Downtime Identity Column Changes

I’m getting close to the end of my series on near-zero downtime deployments. This latest post involves identity column changes: There are some tables where you create an identity value and expect to cycle through data. An example for this might be a queue table, where the data isn’t expected to live permanently but it […]

Read More

Changing Constraints in Near-Zero Downtime Situations

I have part six of my interminable series on near-zero downtime deployments: The locking story is not the same as with the primary and unique key constraints. First, there’s one extra piece: the transition will block access to dbo.LookupTable as well as the table we create the constraint on. That’s to keep us from deleting rows in […]

Read More

Categories

June 2018
MTWTFSS
« May Jul »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930