Using The Public Role

Kenneth Fisher explains the public role in SQL Server:

A common misunderstanding is that the CONNECT permission lets you do more than just connect to a database. It doesn’t. Connection only. So how come there are some things that everyone can do once they are connected to a database? Well, it’s the public role. Everyone is a member and that can’t be changed. In fact, you can’t even disable it. Oh, and I should point out that every database has one.

So what does that mean? If you have a table that you want everyone to have read access to you could grant the permission in public.

I never use the public role for anything, and so it’s a benign role.  I strongly dislike database security tools which flag the public role as a risk, mostly because I made the mistake once of believing the tool and had to start granting things like CONNECT to each new login.

Related Posts

Auditing Options With Azure SQL Data Warehouse

Janusz Rokicki explores what is available in Azure SQL Data Warehouse when it comes to auditing: Auditing is disabled by default and the UI experience depends on the region to which the logical server is deployed. For instance, in UK South, the portal offers no options to manage auditing: In North Europe, the portal allows […]

Read More

What’s Coming With Always Encrypted?

Monica Rathbun explains a new feature coming to SQL Server: As I discussed in part 3 there are many roads blocks the can stop the implementation of Always Encrypted (AE). In the current available versions of SQL Server 2016 and 2017, along with Azure SQL Database, the cost of using AE was way too high […]

Read More

Categories

May 2018
MTWTFSS
« Apr Jun »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031