Visualizing Geo-Spatial Data In R

Carson Sievert shows off the plotly library:

You might be wondering, “What can plotly offer over other interactive mapping packages such as leafletmapviewmapedit, etc?”. One big feature is the linked brushing framework, which works best when linking plotly together with other plotly graphs (i.e., only a subset of brushing features are supported when linking to other crosstalk-compatible htmlwidgets). Another is the ability to leverage the plotly.js API to make efficient updates in shiny apps via plotlyProxy(). Speaking of efficiency, plotly.js keeps on improving the performance of their WebGL-based rendering, so I recommend trying plot_ly() (with toWebGL()) and/or plot_mapbox() if you have lots of graphical elements to render. Also, by having a consistent interface between these various mapping approaches, it’s much quicker and easier to switch from one approach to another when you need to leverage a different set of strengths and weaknesses.

Plotly’s on my list of things I’ll eventually get to one of these days.  H/T R-Bloggers

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