Accessibility And Power BI Reports

Meagan Longoria has some tips to make your Power BI reports easier for people to read:

Avoid using color as the only means of conveying information. Add text cues where possible. It’s very common to show KPIs with a background color or a box next to a metric that uses red/yellow/green to indicate status. Users who have difficulties seeing color need another way to understand the status of a key metric. This could mean that you use a text icon in addition to or instead of color to indicate a status. Power BI reports often include conditional formatting to change the background color or font color of items in a table to convey high/low or acceptable/unacceptable values. If that is important for your users to understand, you could add a field containing the values “high” and “low” to the table itself or to the tooltips. Tooltips are accessible to screen readers via the accessible Show Data table (Alt + Shift + F11).

These are good design principles in addition to providing accessibility benefits.

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