Rob Farley looks at how GROUP BY and DISTINCT and lead you down different execution plan paths:

What I want to explore in this post is the particular example that we both used… to bring an important point that could be missed because of the similarity of our examples.

You see, we both happened to use a FOR XML concatenation query, looking back at the same table. We did this to simulate a practical GROUP BY – somewhere that you might feel like GROUP BY is useful, but you know that you’re not using an aggregate function like SUM or MAX, but there isn’t one available. Ok, for Aaron he could’ve used the really new STRING_AGG, but for the old-timer like me, having to use SQL Server 2005, that wasn’t available.

In this post, Rob looks at a different sort of example and sees a more complicated scenario unfold.

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