Tracking T-SQL Code Progress

Kevin Feasel



Louis Davidson has a couple of ways of tracking progress and success of T-SQL code:

For a process that runs for 10 seconds, this is no problem at all. But when you are doing 100s of loops, and they take time, you don’t want to wait. Eventually, data will start spurting out, but not immediately. We want immediately, even if it isn’t the optimum way.

The PRINT statement won’t output immediately, but its cousin, good old RAISERROR, does. Using a severity of 10 for the message, the message will be output just like a PRINT message. Then, adding WITH NOWAIT to the RAISERROR, the messages will no longer be queued for output, and will be returned immediately.

Both of the techniques Louis shares are useful for keeping track of progress in code.  I’d expect that as tooling gets more sophisticated with respect to live execution plans, we might eventually get to the point where there’s an overall expected progress indicator, something which would be quite useful when three levels of management are standing at your desk waiting for something to finish.

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