Restoration With Replacement

Joey D’Antoni tests whether RESTORE WITH REPLACE is functionally different from dropping a database and performing a restoration:

I recently read something that said using the RESTORE WITH REPLACE command could be faster than dropping a database and then performing a RESTORE, because the shell of the file could be used and therefore skip file initialization. I did not think that was the case, but books online wasn’t clear about the situation, so I went ahead and built a quick test case, using ProcMon from sysinternals. If you aren’t familar with the sysinternals tools, you should be—they are a good way to get under the hood of your Windows Server to see what’s going on, and if you’re old like me, you probably used PSEXEC to “telnet” into a Windows server to restart a service before RDP was a thing.

Read on to see how the processes compare.

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