Basics Of Azure SQL Data Warehouse

Minette Steynberg has an article introducing Azure SQL Data Warehouse:

Azure SQL DW is best used for analytical workloads that makes use of large volumes of data and needs to consolidate disparate data into a single location.

Azure SQL DW has been specifically designed to deal with very large volumes of data. In fact, if there is too little data it may perform poorly because the data is distributed. You can imagine that if you had only 10 rows per distribution, the cost of consolidating the data will be way more than the benefit gained by distributing it.

SQL DW is a good place to consolidate disparate data, transform, shape and aggregate it, and then perform analysis on it. It is ideal for running burst workloads, such as month end financial reporting etc.

Azure SQL DW should not be used when small row by row updates are expected as in OLTP workloads. It should only be used for large scale batch operations.

Azure SQL Data Warehouse is fantastic when you’ve got a setup like above and are willing to pay a premium to make things faster.  And with appropriately distributed data, it certainly does get faster.

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