Event Sourcing And Kafka

Kevin Feasel

2017-08-09

Hadoop

Ben Stopford gives an architectural overview of how Apache Kafka can act as an event sourcing system:

At a high level, event sourcing is really just the observation that in an event driven architecture, the events are facts. So if you keep them around, you can use them as a datasource.

One subtlety comes from the way the events are modelled. They can be values: whole facts (an Order, in its entirety) or they can be a set of ‘deltas’ that must be re-combined (a whole Order message, followed by messages denoting just the state changes: “amount updated to $5”, “order cancelled” etc).

As an analogy, imagine you are building a version control system. When a user commits a file for the first time, you save it. Subsequent commits might only save the ‘delta’: just the lines that were added, changed or removed. Then, when the user performs a checkout, you open the version-0 file and apply all the deltas, to derive to the current state.

The alternate approach is to simply store the whole file, exactly as it was at the time it was changed. This makes pulling out a version quick and easy, but to compare different versions you would have to perform a ‘diff’.

The series Ben has been working through is very helpful in wrapping your mind around what Kafka can do, and this post was no exception.

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