The Risks Of Clearing The Procedure Cache

Erin Stellato explains two downsides to running DBCC FREEPROCCACHE or anything else which clears query plans:

Ideally, you should remove only what’s absolutely necessary.  Using DBCC FREEPROCCACHE is a sledgehammer approach and typically creates a spike in CPU as all subsequent queries need to have their plans re-generated.  Glenn gives examples on how to use each statement (and others) in his post Eight Different Ways to Clear the SQL Server Plan Cache, and I want to show you one more thing that happens when you clear a plan (or all plans) from cache.

For this demo script, I recommend running it against a TEST/DEV/QA environment because I am removing plans from cache which can adversely affect performance.

There are reasons to run these commands, but ideally, you should be as precise as possible in clearing plans out of the cache.

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