Planning For A Good Disaster

Randolph West loves it when a (disaster recovery) plan comes together:

My first question to the attendee was what the Service Level Agreement (SLA) says. As we know from previous posts, a disaster recovery strategy is dictated by business requirements, not technical ones. The Recovery Point Objective (how much data loss is acceptable) and Recovery Time Objective (how much time there is to bring everything back) will guide my proposal.

He told me that the SLA was 24 hours, so I started writing on the white board while I was thinking aloud.

On average, a fast storage layer can read and write around 200 MB/s, so it would take 5.12 seconds to write 1 GB, or just under 85 minutes to restore the database back to disk, not counting the log file or crash recovery. I never assume that Instant File Initialization is enabled, plus I won’t know how big the transaction log file is going to be, and that needs to be zeroed out.

I like this post a lot because it lets us get a glimpse into Randolph’s thought process and gives some hard numbers that you should have in mind.

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