Avoid Ticks

Michael J. Swart shows you how to convert DATETIME2 values to Ticks:

A .Net tick is a duration of time lasting 0.1 microseconds. When you look at the Tick property of DateTime, you’ll see that it represents the number of ticks since January 1st 0001.
But why 0.1 microseconds? According to stackoverflow user CodesInChaos “ticks are simply the smallest power-of-ten that doesn’t cause an Int64 to overflow when representing the year 9999”.

Even though it’s an interesting idea, just use one of the datetime data types, that’s what they’re there for. I avoid ticks whenever I can.

I agree with Michael:  avoid using Ticks if you can.

Related Posts

Using DATEADD Instead Of DATEDIFF

Michael J. Swart points out a bit of trickery with DATEDIFF: I assumed that the DATEDIFF function I wrote worked this way: Subtract the two dates to get a timespan value and then return the number of seconds (rounded somehow) in that timespan. But that’s not how it works. The docs for DATEDIFF say: “Returns the count (signed integer) of […]

Read More

When AT TIME ZONE Is Too Slow

Robert Davis troubleshoots a performance problem relating to time zones: Time Zones were definitely being a drag today. I got an email from one of the developers at work asking about the performance difference between 2 queries. The only difference between the 2 queries is that one of them uses the AT TIME ZONE clause that was […]

Read More

Categories

July 2017
MTWTFSS
« Jun Aug »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31