Comparing Memory-Optimized Versus On-Disk Performance

Erin Stellato has a performance comparison between disk-based and memory-optimized tables:

I developed the following test cases:

  1. A disk-based table with traditional stored procedures for DML.
  2. An In-Memory table with traditional stored procedures for DML.
  3. An In-Memory table with natively compiled procedures for DML.

I was interested in comparing performance of traditional stored procedures and natively compiled procedures, because one restriction of a natively compiled procedure is that any tables referenced must be In-Memory. While single-row, solitary modifications may be common in some systems, I often see modifications occurring within a larger stored procedure with multiple statements (SELECT and DML) accessing one or more tables. The In-Memory OLTP documentation strongly recommends using natively compiled procedures to get the most benefit in terms of performance. I wanted to understand how much it improved performance.

Read on for the results.

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Jos de Bruijn announces a feature coming to the next version of SQL Server: We just added new database-scoped configuration options that will help with monitoring performance of natively compiled stored procedures. The new options XTP_PROCEDURE_EXECUTION_STATISTICS and XTP_QUERY_EXECUTION_STATISTICS are available now in Azure SQL Database, and will be available in the next major release of SQL Server. These options […]

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