Continuous Integration Is A Process

Derik Hammer makes the vital point that continuous integration isn’t a tool; it’s a process:

SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT) is a tool that I am particularly familiar with and will become the subject of my examples. SSDT database projects shift the source of truth from your database to your source control. The intent is that the project and its build artifact, the dacpac, is the desired state of your database. SSDT will then generate the code necessary for you to migrate from your current state to the desired state.

The problem with my description is that it is similar to saying, “hammers drive nails into wood,” and then expecting that you won’t have to learn how to swing the hammer, aim at the head of the nail, or regulate how hard you hit it. Tools like SSDT are not magic and they can have problems. A solid understanding of how they work can mitigate or completely avoid these issues, however.

Click through for Derik’s rant.

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