Multi-Joins In SQL

Kevin Feasel



Vladimir Oselsky hits on something I dislike:

My first gut reaction was that this code is broken and would not run. To my amazement code ran just fine. Now came the hard part, which was to figure out what the code was doing because I have never seen this syntax before. Since I did not understand what I was looking at I could not BING “weird join syntax” to get an answer. As a developer, I learned long time ago to break down code into smallest possible chunks to get the answer.

After I have figured out the relationship between tables, I was able to understand what query was doing. To be able to read query better it can be rewritten in the following way.

Do read Vlad’s post.  I’ve seen terrible misuse of this plus right outer joins, and I don’t know if I’ve ever seen a case where using this syntax made the code easier to understand.

Related Posts


Kenneth Fisher explains a couple of database name functions in SQL Server: I’d never seen ORIGINAL_DB_NAME until recently and I thought it would be interesting to highlight it out, and in particular the difference between it and DB_NAME. I use DB_NAME and DB_ID fairly frequently in support queries (for example what database context is a query running from or what database are […]

Read More

Using STRING_AGG In SQL Server 2017

Derik Hammer talks about one of the nicer T-SQL additions in SQL Server 2017: Creating comma separated strings from a column, or delimited strings as I like to call it, is a very common problem in SQL. Beginning with SQL Server 2017 and Azure SQL Database, there is now another option to the existing set of solutions, STRING_AGG(). I […]

Read More


March 2017
« Feb Apr »