Thinking About Contexts

Ewald Cress has started a new series on system internals:

Per-processor partitioning of certain thread management functions makes perfect sense, since we’d aim to minimise the amount of global state. Thus each processor would have its own dispatcher state, its own timer list… And hang on, this is familiar territory we know from SQLOS! The only difference is that SQLOS operates on the premise of virtualising a CPU in the form of a Scheduler, whereas the OS kernel deals with physical CPUs, or at least what it honestly believes to be physical CPUs even in the face of CPU virtualisation.

This is a start to a very interesting series.

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