SET NOEXEC ON

Andy Kelly shows how to prevent part of a script from running:

 

If we were to hit F5 (or however you execute your TSQL statements in SSMS) without highlighting any statement(s) they would all be executed, one batch after the other. Even if one batch were to fail or we had a THROW in that batch it would fail at that point but execution would continue immediately after the next GO until the end. This is where SET NOEXEC ON comes into play. If I add that at the beginning of the script all succeeding code would not be executed. The statements would only be compiled and not actually run. It would look like this:

SET NOEXEC ON;

PRINT ‘Got Here 1’ ;
GO
PRINT ‘Got Here 2’ ;
GO
PRINT ‘Got Here 3’ ;
GO
PRINT ‘Got Here 4’ ;
GO

This is a useful “accidental F5” protection:  you can put it at the top of your long script to keep from running the whole thing at once.

Related Posts

Validating SSIS Packages Using T-SQL

Annie Xu shows us how to validate SSIS packages in the SSISDB catalog using T-SQL: Recently, I need to do a data warehouse migration for a client. Since there might be some difference between the Dev environment source databases and Prod environment source databases. The migrated SSIS packages for building data warehouse might have some […]

Read More

APPROX_COUNT_DISTINCT

Niko Neugebauer is happy with a new function in SQL Server 2019: A rather interesting result takes place if we scale our database to 100GB TPCH and run the very same queries – the total elapsed time jumps to 50% difference (from 30%), the CPU execution time difference is kept at 50%, but the memory […]

Read More

Categories

February 2017
MTWTFSS
« Jan Mar »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728