Lists And Ranges In Powershell And T-SQL

Phil Factor has an interesting post on lists and ranges in two languages:

When a  list like ‘1,3,5,6,9’, or ’12 Jan 2016,14 Jan 2016, 18 Feb 2016’  contains a datatype that can be unambiguously sorted in the order of the values of the datatype, it becomes possible to imply a range. This will trim unwieldy lists significantly if they have a lot of contiguous values.  ‘1,2,3,4,5’ can be expressed as 1-5 (or 1..5). The starting integer is separated from the end integer in the range by a dash sign. This representation rather clashes with the minus sign, represented by the same symbol, but the comma removes the ambiguity. A number followed immediately by a ‘-‘ means that the ‘-‘is a range symbol.  As with SQL’s BETWEEN clause that selects rows, the range includes all the integers in the interval including both endpoints. Because the range syntax is intended to be a more compact form,  it is generally only used where there are at least three contiguous values.

Interesting article.  I recommend checking it out.

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