Cardinality Estimator Regressions

SQL Scotsman has a great post on figuring out which of your queries have become worse as a result of the SQL Server cardinality estimator changes in 2014:

Instantly it is apparent that the most resource intensive query was the same query across both workload tests and note that the query hash is consistent too.  It is also apparent that this query performs worse under the new cardinality estimator model version 120.  To investigate and understand why this particular query behaves differently under the different cardinality estimators we’ll need to look at the actual query and the execution plans.

Looking at the information in #TempCEStats and the execution plans, the problematic query below belongs to the SLEV stored procedure.

There’s also a discussion of Query Store in there, but it’s important to understand how to figure this out even if you’re on 2014 and don’t have access to Query Store.

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