Delayed Durability

Chris Taylor gives a use case for Delayed Durability:

During development and initial testing on our own hardware, we had the migration at the time running at ~25minutes for around 600 packages (ie. tables) covering (what we termed) RawSource–>Source–>Staging which was well within the performance requirements for the stage that development was at and for what was initially set out. The rest of this blog post will hone in specifically on Source–>Staging only.

However, once we transferred the solution to the clients development environment things took a turn for the worse. In our environment we were running VMs with 8 cores, 16GB RAM and utlising SSDs. The client environment was running SQL Server 2016 Enterprise on VMWare vSphere 5.5, 8 vCPUs, 32GB RAM (for Integration, Development was half this) but the infrastructure team have done everything in their power to force all VMs onto the lower tier (ie. slow disks) of their 3-PAR SAN and throttle them in every way possible, just to make things more of a challenge. Even though the VM’s themselves were throttled we were confident that we wouldn’t see too much of a performance impact, especially as this was only a subset of the processing to be done so we needed it to be quick and it will only ever get longer and longer.

Chris walks through the hallmarks of when Delayed Durability might work, and the big one for me is the way data migration works:  full reloads.  The important thing is to have a durable source and a process to repeat data loads when things get missed; in this case, it’s a full reload, but in other cases it could be watchdog applications which compare data sets on each side.

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