SQL Server In Containers

Andrew Pruski shows how to install Docker on Windows Server 2016 and pull down a SQL Express container:

But what about connecting remotely? This isn’t going to be much use if we can’t remotely connect!

Actually connecting remotely is the same as connecting to a named instance. You just use the server’s IP address (not the containers private IP) and the non-default port that we specified when creating the container (remember to allow access to the port in the firewall).
Easy, eh?

Containers are great, though I do have trouble wrapping my head around containerized databases and have had struggles getting containerized Hadoop to work the way I want.

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