Scheduler Stories

Ewald Cress has a couple of posts about the scheduler.  First, fiber mode scheduling:

The title of this post is of course an allusion to Ken Henderson’s classic article The perils of fiber mode, where he hammers home the point that fiber scheduling, a.k.a. lightweight pooling, appears seductive until you realise what you have to give up to use it.

We’ll get to the juicy detail in a moment, but as a reminder, the perils of fibers lie in their promiscuity: many fibers may share one thread, its kernel structures and its thread-local storage. This is no problem for code that was written with fibers in mind, including all of SQLOS, but unfortunately there are bodies of code for which this isn’t true.

Next up is the Windows scheduler:

Hardware interrupts, which run in kernel mode and return to user mode quickly, should be nothing more than tiny hiccups in a running thread’s quantum. The other 90% of the interrupt iceberg manifests in user mode as Deferred Procedure Calls (DPCs, or “bottom halves” to the Linux crowd) but should still only steal small change in terms of CPU cycles. Context switches to another thread represent a completely different story, because it could be ages before control returns to our thread, meaning that our fiber scheduler is completely out of commission for a while.

This possibility – a SQLOS scheduler losing the CPU for an extended period – is just one of those things we need to live with, but on a sane server, it shouldn’t be something to be too concerned about. Consider that this happens all the time in virtualised environments, where our vCPU can essentially cease to exist while another VM has a ride on the physical CPU.

These are fairly long reads, but we’re getting to levels where you can see these settings in the Database Engine (like Lightweight Pooling).

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