SQL Agent Job Durations As TimeSpans

Rob Sewell shows us how to convert the SQL Agent job duration into a .NET TimeSpan using Powershell:

The first job took 15 hours 41 minutes  53 seconds, the second 1 minute 25 seconds, the third 21 seconds. This makes it quite tricky to calculate the duration in a suitable datatype. In T-SQL people use scripts like the following from MSSQLTips.com

((run_duration/10000*3600 + (run_duration/100)%100*60 + run_duration%100 + 31 ) / 60)  as ‘RunDurationMinutes’

I wish that some version of SQL Server would fix this “clever” duration.  We’ve had the time datatype since 2008; at least add a new column with run duration as a time value if you’re that concerned with backwards compatibility.

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