Flink And Kafka Streams

Neha Narkhede and Stephan Ewen compare Apache Flink versus Kafka Streams:

Before Flink, users of stream processing frameworks had to make hard choices and trade off either latency, throughput, or result accuracy. Flink was the first open source framework (and still the only one), that has been demonstrated to deliver (1) throughput in the order oftens of millions of events per second in moderate clusters, (2) sub-second latency that can be as low as few 10s of milliseconds, (3) guaranteed exactly once semantics for application state, as well as exactly once end-to-end delivery with supported sources and sinks (e.g., pipelines from Kafka to Flink to HDFS or Cassandra), and (4) accurate results in the presence of out of order data arrival through its support for event time. Flink is based on a cluster architecture with master and worker nodes. Flink clusters are highly available, and can be deployed standalone or with resource managers such as YARN and Mesos. This architecture is what allows Flink to use a lightweight checkpointing mechanism to guarantee exactly-once results in the case of failures, as well allow easy and correct re-processing via savepoints without sacrificing latency or throughput. Finally, Flink is also a full-fledged batch processing framework, and, in addition to its DataStream and DataSet APIs (for stream and batch processing respectively), offers a variety of higher-level APIs and libraries, such as CEP (for Complex Event Processing), SQL and Table (for structured streams and tables), FlinkML (for Machine Learning), and Gelly (for graph processing). Flink has been proven to run very robustly in production at very large scale by several companies, powering applications that are used every day by end customers.

The upshot is that the two products don’t do exactly the same thing, and there might be room in your organization for the two of them.

Related Posts

Erasure Coding In Hadoop

Guy Shilo explains erasure coding, a new feature in Hadoop 3: The benefits are, of course, space-saving, and for large files also improved performance (blocks striped across datanodes can be read in parallel, and less blocks are written because there is no x3 replication). The larger the file the more notable is the performance gain. […]

Read More

Converting CSV To ORC

Mark Litwintschik investigates whether Spark is faster at converting CSV files to ORC format than Hive or Presto: Spark, Hive and Presto are all very different code bases. Spark is made up of 500K lines of Scala, 110K lines of Java and 40K lines of Python. Presto is made up of 600K lines of Java. […]

Read More

Categories

September 2016
MTWTFSS
« Aug Oct »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930