Calculating DTU

Kevin Feasel

2016-08-25

Cloud

John Sterrett gives us a measure for calculating DTUs in Azure SQL Database:

The whole query is below. Right now, let’s just focus on the secret sauce. The secret sauce is how DTU percentage gets calculated.  In a nutshell, the maximum of CPU, Data IO, Log Write Percent determine your DTU percentage.  What does this mean to you? Your max consumer limits you. So, you can be using 1% of your IO but still be slowed down because CPU could be your max consumer resource.

That’s a rather interesting finding.  I think the next step (which may be so context-dependent that it’s not possible to generalize) might be to figure out what various workloads do to the metrics and if there’s a way to predict with some reasonable accuracy the expected DTU load given an anticipated change in workload, rather than seeing the value spike and reacting to it later.

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