Solr Lock Contention

Michael Sun shows how the Apache Solr team found and fixed a performance issue in their code:

Based on this testing, lock contention, which usually results in a performance bottleneck and underutilized resources, was our first “suspect.” We knew that using a commercial Java profiler, such as Yourkit, JProfiler and Java Flight Recorder, would help easily identify locks and determine how much time threads spend waiting on them. Meanwhile, the team had built custom infrastructure that allows one to run experiments with a profiler attached via a single command-line parameter.

In my own testing, the profiler data indeed revealed some contention particularly related to VersionBucket andHdfsUpdateLog locks, leading to long thread wait time. Although promisingly, this result corresponded somewhat to the description in SOLR-6820, nothing actionable resulted from the experiment.

I like these sorts of case studies because example is the school of mankind.  In this particular case, I really like the methodical approach, using available information to search for a root cause.  Some of the things Michael calls “false starts” I would consider to be initial steps:  checking OS, filesystem, and garbage collection metrics are important even in a case like this in which they did not lead to the culprit, as they help you eliminate suspects.

Related Posts

NOLOCK Doesn’t Mean No Locks

Bert Wagner points out that SELECT queries with NOLOCK can still cause blocking to occur: This is where my understanding of NOLOCK was wrong: while NOLOCKwon’t lock row level data, it will take out a schema stability lock. A schema stability (Sch-S) lock prevents the structure of a table from changing while the query is executing. All SELECT statements, including those […]

Read More

Columnstore Deadlocking

Kendra Little shows us a scenario in which querying columnstore metadata during table updates can lead to a deadlock: I was playing around with a nonclustered columnstore index on a disk-based table. Here’s what I was doing: Session 1: this session repeatedly changed the value for a single row, back and forth. This puts it into […]

Read More

Categories

August 2016
MTWTFSS
« Jul Sep »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031