Over-Engineering

Dave Copeland discusses over-engineering problems:

The main problem with an over-engineered solution is that it takes longer to ship than is necessary. By definition, we are doing more than is necessary, and that will take longer to ship. There’s almost never a reason to prefer longer ship-times over shorter ones, all things being equal.

The more serious problem with over-engineering is the carry cost.

A carrying cost is a cost the team bears for having to maintain software and infrastructure. Each feature requires tests, monitoring, and maintenance. Each new feature is made in the context of those that came before it. This is why a feature that might’ve taken one week when the project was new requires a month to make in more mature project.

Read the whole thing and simplify your solutions.

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