Memory-Optimized Objects In The Transaction Log

Frank Gill looks at the fn_dblog_xtp function:

Transactions against an in-memory table will return a single row in the result set from fn_dblog, while the result set from fn_dblog_xtp will contain a row for all activity. For example, if you insert 100 rows into an in-memory table, fn_dblog will contain 3 records: a BEGIN TRANSACTION, a single row for the INSERT, and a COMMIT TRANSACTION. fn_dblog_xtp will contain 102 records: a BEGIN TRANSACTION, and a row for each row inserted, and a COMMIT TRANSACTION.

One of the new columns in fn_dblog_xtp is xtp_object_id. I tried to join this to the sys.objects table to return the object name, but the values didn’t match. After banging my head against my monitor for a while, I posed the question to #sqlhelp on Twitter. Andreas Wolter (b|t) responded that a correlation can be made using DMV sys.memory_optimized_tables_internal_attributes.  Excited, I tried to join fn_dblog_xtp to the DMV, but was disappointed.

Read the whole thing.

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