Licensing Hyper-Converged Architectures

David Klee discusses SQL Server licensing on a unique (but growing in popularity) hardware architecture:

Now, look at the hyper-converged architectures. The CPUs used for I/O handling are the same as those that your VMs use to power your applications. A substantial portion of the host’s CPU power is now needed for I/O handling, and this activity comes first in the CPU scheduling queues.

This fact, by itself, is not necessarily a problem. Most virtualization host CPUs are relatively lightly utilized, and this amount of CPU needed for I/O handling is readily absorbed without causing a performance problem.

But, larger scale SQL Servers can read and write exceptionally large amounts of data around the clock. The I/O handling at the host layer can start to drain resources from the host. The additional activity scheduling time inside the hypervisor could be slowing down these SQL Servers without you knowing it.

As always, work out how your licensing would look under different alternatives or you could end up wasting a pretty penny.

Related Posts

Changes To SQL Server’s Servicing Model

Pedro Lopes announces changes to SQL Server’s servicing model: Starting with SQL Server 2017, we are adopting a simplified, predictable mainstream servicing lifecycle: SPs will no longer be made available. Only CUs, and GDRs when needed. CUs will now accommodate localized content, allowing new feature completeness and supportability enhancements to be delivered faster. CUs will […]

Read More

Automated Edition Downgrade For SQL Server

Jana Sattainathan shows how to automate downgrade of SQL Server Enterprise to Standard: Standard edition is limited to lesser of 4 sockets or 24 cores with a maximum memory of 128 GB plus a few truly Enterprise level features like Compression, Availability Groups, Partitioning etc are off limits. I would say most places would fall […]

Read More

Categories

July 2016
MTWTFSS
« Jun Aug »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031