Service Broker Networking

Colleen Morrow discusses endpoints and routes in Service Broker:

One of the first questions you might ask when distributing Service Broker solutions across multiple machines is “how does SQL Server know where the other service is?”  And that’s where routes come in.  When we distribute a Service Broker solution, we use routes to tell SQL Server the server name and endpoint port of a remote service on the network.

For example, in our taxes solution, we would create a route in the Taxpayer database that points to the IRS service, and a route in the IRS database that points to the Taxpayer service

Good stuff.  A big part of Service Broker’s value is its ability to communicate across servers, not just databases on the same instance.

Related Posts

Message Queues For The DBA

Drew Furgiuele explains message queueing theory and puts together a nice demo: Please note, there’s one thing I need to make super abundantly clear for this demo: You’d never, ever configure these components like this for production. There’s so much more to consider, like setting up RabbitMQ to use SSL, writing actual applications and services instead of […]

Read More

Identifying Deprecated Features

Dave Mason provides a method for determining if you’re using deprecated functionality on your SQL Server instance: I’ve wanted to do some Event Notification testing for SQL Server deprecation events for quite some time. The thought process here is that I could send myself an alert to identify usage of SQL Server features that will […]

Read More

Categories

June 2016
MTWTFSS
« May Jul »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930