Clustered Indexes

Derik Hammer looks at the power of clustered indexes:

The data in a clustered index is logically sorted but does not guarantee that it will be physically sorted. The physical sorting is simply a common misconception. In fact, the rows on a given page are not sorted even though all rows contained on that page will be appropriate to its place in the logical sort order. Also, the pages on disk are not guaranteed to be sorted by the logical key either.

The most likely time where you will have a clustered index that is physically sorted is immediately after an index rebuild operation. If you are trying to optimize for sequential reads, setting a fill factor to leave free space on your pages will help limit how often you have pages physically out of order at the expense of disk space.

Derik also discusses four qualities for a good clustered index.  My preferred acronym is NUSE (Narrow, Unique, Static, Ever-increasing); Derik uses slightly different terms.

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