Powershell ETL, Part 2

Max Trinidad has part 2 of his Powershell ETL series:

If you notice, in the above cmdlet the where-clause I’m selecting to use the Column1 property instead of a reasonable label. In my scenario the data in the CSV file contain variable columns fopr its different data types such as: Info, Error, and System. So, it was easy to identify the total number of columns to be 15 columns.

Now, using the cmdlet “Import-Csv” using the parameter “-Header”, you can define a list columns when you build the $Logdata object. We create the $header variable with the column-names separated by comma.

Keep an eye out for part 3.  In the meantime, check out part 1 if you haven’t already.

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