Dashboard Design

Melissa Yu explains how people look at dashboards:

Dashboards can be used to communicate a dense collection of information efficiently on a single canvas. Your audience has a limited amount of time to monitor key metrics to get a quick status and identify anything that needs attention. The attention span of the average human has gone from about 12 seconds in 2000 (when mobile phones became mainstream) to about 8 seconds today – a second less than a goldfish – according to a 2015 study.

Following data visualization design principles is key to making your dashboard easily consumable. A poorly designed dashboard can make your eyes jump all over the screen. While it won’t give you much insight, it may cause a headache. In the Western world, we read from top left to right, then zig-zag down left and scroll right again (in a Z-pattern). Understanding where the audience’s eyes will start and travel next allows you to guide them through your dashboard.

Check the link for more details.

Related Posts

Scatterplots For Multivariate Analysis

Neil Saunders declutters a complicated visual with a simple scatterplot: Sydney’s congestion at ‘tipping point’ blares the headline and to illustrate, an interactive chart with bars for city population densities, points for commute times and of course, dual-axes. Yuck. OK, I guess it does show that Sydney is one of three cities that are low density, […]

Read More

Building Cone Plots In Plotly

The Plotly blog shows how to use Python to build 3D cone plots using Plotly: This plot uses an explicitly defined vector field. A vector field refers to an assignment of a vector to each point in a subset of space. In this plot, we visualize a collection of arrows that simply model the wind […]

Read More

Categories

May 2016
MTWTFSS
« Apr Jun »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031