Business Logic

Ed Elliott hits a classic architectural argument—whether business logic should be in stored procedures;

Stackoverflow is a specific use case and they decided to use .Net so they have a specific set of problems to deal with in terms of performance. They deploy (as I understand it) 10 times a day so if they need to change a query then they can quickly and easily – how quickly can you modify code and get it to production to fix a problem causing downtime on your mission critical app written in powerbuilder 20 years ago? (I jest but you get the point)

I like Ed’s back-and-forth arguing, as there are legitimate cases for both sides and the best answer almost always is somewhere in between for line of business apps.   I have three points that I tend to mention whenever this discussion comes up.

First, a lot of “business logic” is actually data logic.  Check constraints, foreign key constraints, unique key constraints, and even primary key constraints (for non-surrogate primary keys) are business rules, but they’re business rules around how the data is shaped and it’s a lot better to use your database system to maintain those rules.

Second, validation rules should be everywhere.  The fancy Javascript library should do validation, the server-side business logic should do validation, and the database should do validation.  You don’t know what’s going to skip one or more of these layers, and your database is the final gatekeeper preventing bad data from sneaking into your system.

Third, at the margin, go where your maintenance developers are most comfortable.  If they’re really good with C# but not good with SQL, the marginal business logic (the stuff you could really go either way on) should stay in the app tier; if your maintainers have really strong SQL skills but are lagging on the .NET side, I’d stick the marginal logic in stored procedures.

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