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Category: Stored Procedures

Stored Procedure Return Values and Entity Framework Core

Erik Ejlskov Jensen shows us how to retrieve the return value from a stored procedure using Entity Framework Core:

SQL Server stored procedures can return data in three different ways: Via result sets, OUTPUT parameters and RETURN values – see the docs here.

I have previously blogged about getting result sets with FromSqlRaw here and here.

I have blogged about using OUTPUT parameters with FromSqlRaw here.

In this post, let’s have a look at using RETURN values.

Click through for the process.

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With Query Store, Alter instead of Drop and Create

Erin Stellato has a recommendation when running Query Store:

When I talk about Plan Forcing I always discuss how users should ALTER procedures when using Query Store, and not use DROP and CREATE. This is valid beyond Plan Forcing cases; it’s a best practice I recommend however you are using Query Store. Every query stored in Query Store has an object_id associated with it, which ties it back to its object (stored procedure, function, etc.). This is critical not just for plan forcing, but also when you want to look at historical performance for a query after a change to the object.

Read on for a demonstration of why this is important.

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Passing Power Query Parameters to Stored Procedures

Soheil Bakhshi shows how we can take an input from Power Query and pass it to a stored porcedure:

This is the fourth one in the form of Quick Tips. Here is the scenario. One of my customers had a requirement to get data from a Stored Procedure from SQL Server. She required to pass the values from a Query Parameter back to SQL Server and get the results in Power BI.

The solution is somewhat easy.

If you’re familiar with SQL Server Reporting Services, the solution instantly makes sense.

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Generating Stored Procedure Mappings for Entity Framework Core

Erik Ejlskov Jensen takes us through stored procedure mapping with Entity Framework Core Power Tools:

In my previous post I showed how you can map and use stored procedures manually from EF Core, a process which involved quite a bit of code, and some changes to your derived DbContext.

With the latest release of EF Core Power Tools, you can opt-in to have any SQL Server stored procedures in your database made available to you.

Click through to learn how to do this.

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Calling Stored Procedures with Output Parameters from Entity Framework Core

Erik Ejlskov Jensen shares how to call a stored procedure which includes an output parameter from Entity Framework Core:

In this post I will show how you can call stored procedures with OUTPUT parameters from EF Core. I am using the Northwind database for the sample code.

Erik’s code doesn’t have this problem, but using FromSqlRaw can lead to SQL injection problems if you aren’t careful with sanitizing inputs.

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Against Encrypted Stored Procedures

Denny Cherry explains why encrypting stored procedures is a fool’s errand:

To this I point out, that if you’ve encrypted your code so that I won’t look at it by accident, you are actually getting the exact opposite result. Because you are encrypting code that means that I can’t see if. That means that I want to make sure that you aren’t hiding any stupid practices from me. That means that as soon as I see your encrypted procedures I’m decrypting them to see what is going on with this code.

Along with this, because you’ve bothered to encrypt the stored procedures that means that I can’t get an execution plan, and query store can’t be used for the queries within the stored procedure. And since I’m guessing that I can performance tune your database better then your developers can, I’m going to be decrypting the procedures so that I can tune the system.

They’re trivial to decrypt and Denny points out a few reasons why it’s just a bad idea.

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Handling Messages with Service Broker

Chris Johnson continues a series on Service Broker:

This stored procedure is used by the queue to handle messages that arrive. When a message arrives the queue will execute the procedure over and over until there are no more messages on the queue. Your stored procedure therefore needs to be removing messages as it goes. You have the option to have multiple versions of the query executing at once, to clear down a queue faster or to keep up with a high volume of messages, using the MAX_QUEUE_READERS setting. You can turn the stored procedure on or off using the STATUS, while this is set to OFF nothing will happen but as soon as it is set to ON the query will start processing messages again. Finally you need to specify what user the query will execute under. The options here are SELF, as the current user (the person who runs the CREATE or ALTER script), OWNER, as the person who owns the queue, or a username that the current user has impersonate permissions for.

Chris provides us an example of what a procedure could look like and also covers briefly the concept of poison message handling.

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Stored Parameter Procedure Caching

Greg Dodd follows Betteridge’s Law of Headlines:

When SQL Server caches your plan, it caches it with the parameter values that you pass through the first time, and it assumes that the same query plan will be the best one for any parameter you pass in next time.

But does SQL Server always cache your parameters? Does it always keep track of what you pass in?

Click through for a demonstration good enough to give you a conclusive answer.

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Selecting From a Stored Procedure

Madhivanan shows us how to query the results of a stored procedure:

One of my friends asked me “Is it possible to query Stored Procedure resultset like a table. ie select * from (EXEC Stored_procedure)?”

Well. Querying the resultset from the Stored Procedure like Table can be done using OPENROWSET function

This is a fairly novel approach to the problem. In the past, I’ve inserted the results of a stored procedure into a temp table, but you can only do that if the procedure itself doesn’t call INSERT INTO ... EXEC ....

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