Heaps

Derik Hammer walks us through heap tables as part of his indexing series:

A heap is a grouping of unsorted pages which are not linked. Page anatomy is out of scope for this series since all types of indexed and non-indexed tables use the same page structure but I do encourage you to check out here and here to learn more.

A heap is comprised of one or more index allocation map (IAM) pages which point to the data pages which make up the heap. The only exception to this is when you have a row which has been updated and could not fit in its page anymore. In that case, you get a forwarding pointer to the row which has been moved to an existing page with space or a new page. It is possible for you to produce a chain of forwarding records if the row continues to need relocation by further operations.

This is a good introduction to heaps and will feed into later work on how different types of indexes work.

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