AcquireConnection Failures

Ginger Grant explains what to do when you get AcquireConnection errors:

AcquireConnection method call to the connection manager failed with error code 0xC0202009/0xC020801C

Try as I might, the only thing I was able to do after an hour was periodically change the error code from 0xC0202009 to 0xC020801C. Nothing I did worked. I created a new connection, created a new OleDB Source, changed the Run64BitRuntime to False in Configuration Properties in the Debugging Section of the project execution, set the Data Flow task DelayValidation from False to True. None of these various suggestions that I got from various websites worked at all.  I thought about changing the SSIS Service ID’s execution properties, but since I was running in Debug mode I determined that this would not make any difference, so I abandoned that idea. Nothing worked. The only thing I was able to do was change the error code, not eliminate it. I could log into SQL Server with the same ID and password in my package and run the simple query in the data flow task and return data.  I could preview the data, what I couldn’t do is execute the SSIS package.  Out of desperation I rebooted, which also did nothing.

SSIS security issues.  Gotta love ’em.

Arithmetic With NULL

Kevin Feasel

2016-04-27

T-SQL

Kennie Nybo Pontoppidan looks at how NULL values complicate arithmetic operations:

If NULL is used in an in-row expression, the full expression will be NULL. This makes sense for most arithmetic operations, because NULL means unknown.

Here is an example with NULL plus/minus ONE:

There’s a consistency to NULL operations, but it’s sometimes a weird consistency.

Infrastructure Trends

Glenn Berry reports on hardware trends:

Right now, you can purchase extremely capable, high performance server processors with physical core counts between four and twenty-two cores per processor. I am referring to the current 14nmIntel Xeon E5-2600 v4 (Broadwell-EP) and the 22nm Intel Xeon E7-8800 v3 (Haswell-EX) families that both use high bandwidth DDR4 memory.

On March 31, 2016, Intel released the 14nm Xeon E5-2600 v4 family (Broadwell-EP) for two-socket servers. This is a Tick release, building on the current Haswell microarchitecture that has up to 22 physical cores and DDR4 2400 support. This processor will work in existing model servers such as the Dell PowerEdge R730 with a BIOS update, which means that there will be less delay before they are actually available for sale.

A lot of companies aren’t interested in The Cloud, so it’s good to know that hardware vendors are keeping up with on-premises demands.

Increased NCI Key Size

Jos de Bruijn notes that non-clustered index keys may be larger in SQL Server 2016 and Azure SQL Database:

SQL Server 2016 and Azure SQL Database have increased the maximum size for index keys with nonclustered indexes. The new maximum key size for nonclustered indexes is 1700 bytes. The maximum key size for clustered indexes remains 900 bytes.

95-99% of the time, we don’t want to get anywhere near 900 bytes (much less 1700 bytes), but we all have that one edge case.

SARGable

Shane O’Neill explains what SARGable means and why it’s important:

So now that 1). we have our table and b). we have an index we can use, we can run the developer’s query and be SARGable right?

1
2
3
DECLARE @Year INT = 2016;
SELECT [Test_Date] FROM [dbo].[DateTest] WHERE YEAR([Test_Date]) = @Year;
GO

Nope! Table scan, ignores our Index and reads all 15M (too lazy for all the zeros) for a measely 127,782 rows! It’s not the slowest, taking around 3.960 seconds but still, we want SARGable!!!

Watch for the surprise twist at the end.

Azure Data Catalog Test Environment

Kevin Feasel

2016-04-27

Cloud

Melissa Coates shows how to create a test environment for Azure Data Catalog:

Azure Data Catalog is a Software as a Service (SaaS) offering in Azure, part of the Cortana Intelligence Suite, for registering metadata about data sources. Check this post for an overview of Azure Data Catalog key features. (I’m a big fan of what Azure Data Catalog is trying to accomplish.)

There are a couple of particulars about Azure Data Catalog which make it a bit more difficult to set up a Demo/Test/Learning type of environment, including:

  • You are required to sign into Azure Data Catalog with an organizational account. Signing in with a Microsoft account (formerly known as a Live account) won’t work for Azure Data Catalog authentication, even if that’s what you normally use for Azure.

  • One Azure Data Catalog may be created per organization. Note this is *not* per Azure subscription – if your account has access to multiple subscriptions, it’s still one catalog per organization.

This method seems, shall we say, overly complicated.  Here’s hoping that the Azure Data Catalog team find a way to improve this experience.

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