Parse Query Plans

Richie Lee writes some C# code to parse query plans:

XPath is the bane of my life… it takes a while to find the correct value particularly as there are so many node names that are re-used yet embedded into them. So I added a simple example and a couple with more depth. Nevertheless, running the test should produce a green result. This could be used for more than just testing; DBA’s may find it useful in SQLCLR scenarios.

I’ve uploaded the code to GitHub. The repository is calledXQueryPlanPath.

9/10 would prefer F#.

Seriously, though, this is a nice start if you need to dig into execution plans programmatically.

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