Sloan Digital Sky Survey

Joseph Sirosh and Rimma Nehme show a SQL Server use case, walking us through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey:

Astronomers wanted a tool that would be able to quickly answer questions like: “find asteroid candidates” or “find other objects like this one”, which originally gave the motive to build the SQL-based backend. Indeed, right from the beginning Jim Gray asked Alex Szalay to define 20 typical queries astronomers might want to ask and then together they designed the SkyServer database to answer those queries. The anecdote is that the conversation went as follows:

Jim: What are the 20 questions you want to ask?
Alex: Astronomers want to ask anything! Not just 20 queries.
Jim: Ok, start with 5 queries.
[it took Alex 30 minutes to write them all down]
Jim: Ok, add another 5 queries.
[it took Alex 1 hour to write them all down]
Jim: Ok, now add another 5 queries.
[Alex gave up and went home to think about them]

Alex (said later): In 1.5 hours, Jim taught me a lot of humility!

Alex (said later): It also taught us the importance of long-tail distribution and how to prioritize.

This is my favorite part of the article.

Related Posts

Matrix Transposition In T-SQL

Phil Factor has some fun transposing a matrix using T-SQL: What I’m doing is simply converting the table into its JSON form, and then using this to create a table using the multi-row VALUES  syntax which paradoxically allows expressions. The expression I’m using is JSON_Value, which allows me do effectively dictate the source within the table, via […]

Read More

Taking A Random Walk

Dan Goldstein describes the basics of Brownian motion: I was sitting in a bagel shop on Saturday with my 9 year old daughter. We had brought along hexagonal graph paper and a six sided die. We decided that we would choose a hexagon in the middle of the page and then roll the die to […]

Read More

Categories

March 2016
MTWTFSS
« Feb Apr »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031