Always Encrypted

Kenneth Nielsen takes a look at Always Encrypted:

The way Microsoft have implemented this always encrypted feature, is to let all the data in the tables be encrypted. The application that needs to look at data will have to use the new Enhanced ADO.net library, which will give your application the methods to de/encrypt data.

This way, the only way to insert data into a table, which contains encrypted columns, is to use parameterized insert statements from your application. It is not even possible to insert data from SQL Server Management Studio, if we try, the statement will fail.

This way we ensure that only the persons using the application will be looking at un-encrypted data, thus reducing the number of people with a direct access to sensitive data.

If you go down this route, it looks like the only method available for modifying data is going through ADO.NET, although that could change later.  My biggest concern here is how much of a performance hit—if any—systems will take.

Related Posts

New DMF: dm_db_page_info

Pam Lahoud shows off a new Dynamic Management Function in SQL Server 2019: The primary use case we had in mind when developing this function was troubleshooting page-related waits. Some of the key performance scenarios that require page details to diagnose are tempdb contention, last page insert contention (also see this blog articlefor code samples) and page-level blocking. All of […]

Read More

Testing TDE Performance

Eduardo Pivaral tests the performance of a database with Transparent Data Encryption versus that same database without encryption: Transparent data encryption (TDE) helps you to secure your data at rest, this means the data files and related backups are encrypted, securing your data in case your media is stolen. This technology works by implementing real-time I/O […]

Read More

Categories

November 2015
MTWTFSS
« Jan Dec »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30